Tag Archives: Baur

Five Cars You Can Buy Today that Your Neighbor Doesn’t Have

Neighbor - 1

Part of being a TTSer is coveting the strange, unusual, abnormal, underappreciated, etc. – automotively speaking. One of our favorite pastimes in the TTS offices is to peruse classified ads from the UK, mainland Europe, and even the Far East and elsewhere in search of whacky cars that whet our appetites. A particular favorite website for this colossal timewasting is Germany’s www.mobile.de. So on the tail-end of buying another car this week (details forthcoming) and then tripping on another car I’d wanted to buy only to have the seller take his sweet time getting back to me, I thought I’d distract myself by looking for fun cars that one could conceivably buy for credit card or home equity money – including shipping – and which you’d be 100% certain your neighbor wouldn’t have. Unless he or she is more interesting than you are..
Continue reading

Advertisements

1985 BMW 323i Baur Top Cabriolet: No Sleep ‘Til Hopkins

Baur_AsFound

“Foot on the pedal, never ever false metal.
Engine running hotter than a boiling kettle.”

The wisdom of driving a 30-year-old BMW across some of the more desolate areas of America first came into question as we watched Sparks, Nevada fade from the rearview mirror, casually but rhythmically vibrating in time with the four bent wheels. Continue reading


Living Classified Ads: What’s for Sale in Essen (that we can’t get at home)?

20120321-175413.jpg

So it’s press day at Techno Classica Essen here in the sunny Eastern Bloc-era grey concrete jungle that is Essen, Germany. As promised in yesterday’s comments, one of my first jobs here at the show was to report back on the interesting cars for sale. Specifically, cars that are interesting to us that were either a) never for sale in the US, or b) are so incredibly hard to find in the States that you’re better off buying them here. Bear in mind as I discuss prices that this is the first day, so all of the cars carry the obligatory classic car show markup. Real selling prices should be expected to be lower. Significantly lower.

Continue reading