Category Archives: The Kitchen Sink

Sub-$10K Steal: 1968 Porsche 912 coupe

A lot of folks tend to dismiss the Porsche 912 as nothing more than a VW Beetle with a Porsche body tacked onto it. To those who know better, the 912 more accurately represents the true spiritual descendant to the Porsche 356 series with its Porsche body and chassis mated with a mildly updated version of the 356’s flat four-cylinder motor. We stumbled across this beauty on the Pelican Parts classified forum and were immediately drawn to the period color scheme, apparently straight and solid body, and the recent work it’s had. See it for sale here on Pelican Parts for $9,000 firm in Port Orange, Florida.
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1994 Dodge Viper RT-10: Think Cobra

For my money, the American automobile industry has produced very little that is unique or interesting since about 1969. Sure, that new Cadillac CTS-V Wagon is a little different, but beyond that..? If you look back, American cars had the stronghold on brute muscle. We weren’t refined, but we could power our way through everything. Hmm.. I guess you could say that about pretty much our whole culture, but I digress. In 1992 Chrysler, to just about everybody’s surprise, introduced what many considered to be a modern-day Cobra complete with participation from none other than Carroll Shelby himself in its development: the Dodge Viper. That the Viper ever made it past the show car stage was a testament to the fact that the Big Three can deliver, when the mood strikes them.

This low-mileage red example here on eBay in Chesaning, Michigan with a buy-it-now price $28,495 could very well represent an increasingly rare opportunity to get an “as new” Viper for less than the price of a new Camry. We think they’ll only go up in value from here.

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And now for something completely different: 1985 TVR Tasmin 280i Convertible

I cannot tell you definitively if the British or the Italians actually invented the two-seater sports car, but both take credit. My money is on the Brits, at least for cars that the everyman (or woman) could afford, having built some of the most iconic sports cars ever including the MGB, Spitfire, TR6, Austin-Healey, etcetera, etcetera, etcetera. By the beginning of the 1980s, however, the roadster ship had all but sunk, cars were bloated and underpowered and the British car manufacturing industry was collapsing. Still, there remained a handful of small niche manufacturers building sports cars for enthusiasts, and TVR was one of them. Find this rare TVR Tasmin 280i convertible – one of 472 1985s – here on eBay with a buy it now price of $10,950.

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Hard to Find: Clean, Low-mileage 1987 Audi 4000 Quattro

We’ve been running a lot of Audis on TTS lately (and interestingly, cars from Portland, Oregon), but this one deserves special attention. You see, Audi was somewhat out on their own in the near-luxury all-wheel drive market in the 1980s, and the 4000Q was the first car that combined the company’s rally-winning Quattro system with a car aimed at regular people. Sure, there were AWD Subarus back then, but they were weird, and really more utilitarian than sporting, and certainly not German. With just 73,000 miles and clean all around this car is quite the rarity these days. Find it here on eBay with no reserve in Portland, Oregon.

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Get one while the Gettin’ is Good: 2006 Mercedes-Benz E55 AMG Wagon

I think I may have mentioned that we here at TotallyThatStupid are closet station wagon geeks. In fact, it is mentioned at least here, here, and here. Station Wagons (or “Estate Cars”, if you please) represent the best of both worlds in terms of practical motoring: the stance of a sedan with the utility of a truck. What I want, though, is a Super Wagon!

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Ingostadt’s Ür-Super Sedan: 1993 Audi S4

Inspired by the Mercedes-AMG Hammer, in the late 1980s German luxury carmakers made it part a priority to develop super-sedans in a race for power that continues to this day. The original manufacturer-developed cars were the BMW E28 M5 and the Audi 200 Turbo Quattro. They were quick machines, but rough around the edges – a little too hard for many drivers. The Audi S4 was part of the better-developed second generation of these family-oriented supercars and competed with the BMW E34 M5 and the Mercedes 500E. Both the BMW and the Audi were available with manual transmissions, while the Mercedes was not. The S6, however, had a further distinct advantage: all wheel drive. Find this clean example here on AudiFans in Portland, Oregon with a reasonable 144,000 miles for $7,000.

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